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Buying a Used Car

Posted on December 8th, 2015


Buying a Used Car

Buying a car from a used car lot can be scary. The dealers are eager to earn that paycheck, while you’re trying to save every penny on that new car. It is important to work on the deal overtime and not get too excited about the car itself. The dealers don’t always know if the used car they are about to sell you has issues, their mechanics might have a decent idea but not always. Most used car lots purchase their cars from auctions, where they have no idea what they are purchasing. Sometimes they purchase a heap of metal that isn’t worth they are attempting to sell it to you for.
~ Remember to always ask for a history of the vehicle by purchasing a Carfax… you can buy one on your smart phone if they refuse you, (dealerships shouldn’t deny this from you, if they do leave promptly) this reminds whoever is doing the deal that you mean business and you don’t want to play games!
~ Ask to take it on a test drive, without the person selling you the car in the car (this is when you can take it to a real mechanic to have a good look over on it). Sometimes taking your car to an ASE Mechanic might cost around $100 for the diagnosis, however if you think about all of the headache it might save you $100 is a life saver.
~Once you have had the vehicle checked out, don’t forget to sleep on it and come back the next day. The time away from the vehicle and the pushy sales man allows yo
u the time to think through what you were going to end up getting into. Sometimes this short period of time is just enough to let you breathe and remember why you went there the first place.
– Remembering to take time away from the dealership is vital, this prevents you from making an emotional purchase. Making a “gut” purchase sometimes can end up biting you in the end.
Certified Car Care had the misfortune to have a lady bring in her car trying to get help, she was a victim of a pushy car salesman that didn’t know what he was talking about. She purchased the car, and asked why the car was leaking oil, the salesman told her he would have it taken care of promptly. She didn’t even get to drive the car home the first night. About 17 days later she drove her now fixed car home, parked the car in the driveway and went on about her night. The very next morning while in a rush to work tried to start the car, it wouldn’t turnover. She now thought great the battery or the alternator has kicked the bucket, she took it back to the used car lot, they replaced the battery. She decided it was time to take it to a certified mechanic shop, our techs found that there was leaks throughout the oil chamber in the car, the front cover, the manifold, and even the fuel injector had a leak. Not only was it leaking from almost anywhere oil flows through the engine, but the headlamps were crossed, and the wiring was faulty. The faulty wiring was draining the battery preventing it from keeping a full charge even when the car wasn’t running. Needless to say, had she spent the $49 for a Carfax, and $100 for a tech to look at it in the beginning when it wasn’t in her name and now had a loan for about $12,000 she might have chosen to walk away. Unfortunately for her she now owns a car that requires about $10,000 in repairs that she can not afford.